Short Circuit Ion Channels Cause Pain

  New research shows that the pain signal may be simply an "electrical leak" from an ion channel.  As previously written there is a connection between the opening and closing of ion channels and electrical polarity charges.  The new finding by a team of scientists at KU Leuven indicates the actual pain message is electrical and is short circuited due to chemical changes in the ion channels.  The ongoing research is showing the chemical and physical relationship of pain and electrical polarities.

 For more read this...........

Table of Contents

Research
Why Is Succinate Dehydrogenase Important? Print E-mail

  The production of SDH (succinate dehydrogenase) occurs in the outer membrane of the cell's mitochondria.   The process is associated with the Krebs/Szent-Gyorgi Cycle and is important because it is associated with the below muscular and neuro degenerative  diseases:

 

  • Aging & Longevity,
  • Alpers' ( infantile poliodystrophy)
  • Alzheimer's
  • Aminoaciduria Colestasis
  • Ataxia
  • Barth syndrome 
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Fatal infantile Growth Retardation
  • Gastro Intestine Encephalopathy (MNGIE)  
  • Infantile Encephalopathy
  • Infantile Central nervous System (CNS)
  • Iron overload Lactosis and Early death (GRACILE)
  • Kearns-Sayre Syndrome (KSS)
  • Lactic Acidosis (MELAS)
  • Leber's Syndrone
  • Leigh's
  • Mitochondrial Encephalopathy
  • Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers (MERRF)
  • Myopathy
  • Neuropathy Ataxia
  • Parkinson's
  • Paraganglioma
  • Pheochromocytoma 
  • Progressing External Ophthalmoplegia (PEO)
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa (NARP)
  • Rhabdomyolysis

   The use of volitional exercising and complementary electrical stimulation may be associated with an increase in SDH, or following injury and some diseases the possibility of maintenance of SDH production.  It is not known if injury and disease processes cause a reduction in SDH production, or require an increase to deal with the prevailing condition.

 

 
Functional Rehabilitation Using The Infrex FRM Print E-mail

 

The Latest Breakthrough In Rehabilitation Technology

Infrex FRM

 

The Infrex Functional Rehabilitation Machine Is Designed For:

 

 

 

 
Tendinitis Pain Treatment With Ultrasound Therapy At Home Print E-mail

 Tendons can be found in the ends of muscles and are what attach muscle to bones. Tendons are naturally resilient, but their shortage of flexibility and constant tugging due to their location make sure they are more likely to tear. These minuscule tears cause irritation and soreness. This condition is termed tendonitis. Indications of tendinitis can vary from tenderness and inflexibility in the general area of the affected tendon to burning pain surrounding the affected area.  Hurting will probably be at its worst throughout the day and/or after activities. Tendon and joint sections are often stiff . Those most troubled by this disorder generally utilize the same tendons for repetitive exercises or work, including playing racquetball or pulling levers at a job. The constant motion aggravates the condition and is often relieved by applying cold therapy.

   Tendinitis might be prevented by consistently stretching muscles, especially people who get more use compared to others. This causes the tendons connection to the muscles to increase length, and become more flexible and therefore, less likely to tear.  Tendinitis can turn into a very severe problem if it's not recognized and taken care of quickly. You should cope with the problem at the earliest opportunity to prevent it from reaching a chronic stage, although in some work environments this can be difficult.

   For chronic tendonitis, a portable home ultrasound machine might help relieve this and heal the condition. Ultrasound therapy treatments were once reserved just for pro athletes and people that could afford them. Now, you may use ultrasonic ultrasound to take care of many painful conditions. Therapeutic ultrasound treatment methods are a rehab method which utilizes sound waves to take care of pain, inflammation and muscle spasm. Commonly utilized by chiropractors, doctors and physiotherapists considering that the the safety and effectiveness of ultrasound has long been established inside medical communities. Ultra sound waves penetrate the surface layers on the skin, causing tissues to vibrate, to become a deep heat to soothe inflammation and relieve pain. In addition, ultra sonic devices increase blood circulation and oxygen to lessen local swelling and speed the recovery process.

    Chronic conditions, for example tendinitis, means constant re-injury resulting in additional scarring, decreased range of flexion, limited performance and the century of pain. For tendon injuries, a particular sort of home ultrasound machine that is meant to treat soft tissue injuries is needed. The ultrasound unit should be capable of producing heat which is achieved by constant frequency, or therapeutic physiological relief using a pulsed mode. It's not necessary to always feel compelled to purchase an ultrasound machine. For short term acute injuries the healing time is so minimal that renting an ultrasound machine may be the best option.

   Often a clinical grade ultrasound unit can be rented for less than purchasing the lesser grade home units. With the clinical professional models there can be:

•greater frequency ranges

•different head sizes

•higher outputs

   For acute injuries the ultrasound rental option may be the preferred method and often the rental is covered by insurance. If the usage is for long term use then the an ultrasound physical therapy machine for use in your home, you may want to purchase a device especially if will be covered by insurance and used indefinitely.

   You should look for an FDA approved unit, from an A.C.H.C. accredited company if possible and Medicare approved if Medicare eligible. The ultrasonic unit should come with a minimal 1 year warranty. These home ultrasound machines are very safe and you can choose to rent or buy depending on your specific needs.  In many situations insurance companies will pay for the purchase and rental of ultrasound machines for home use.

 

This video explains better how ultrasound works:

 
Technical Aspects Of Interferential Current (IFC) Print E-mail

    

   Interferential current ( IFC) originated to overcome the problems of skin resistance.  The biological frequency of human cells occurs in the range of .1 - 200 Hertz, or pulses per second ( pps).  This simply means that in order to effect biological changes in cells the pulses that cause that change occur between the two pulse rates identified previously.

     The problem that exists is the cells that a clinician is trying to affect lie below the surface of the skin, so the current has to penetrate through the skin prior to arriving at the targeted cells.  Herein lies the problem. 

Read more... [Technical Aspects Of Interferential Current (IFC)]
 
Professor Giovanni De Domenico, Ph.D. Print E-mail




Giovanni  De Domenico

Grad Dip. (Physiotherapy),  Dip. T.P.,  M.Sc.,  Ph.D.
M.C.S.P.,  M.A.P.A. , M.C.P.A.

Dr. De Domenico ( Gion ) Passed away on Saturday, April 10, 2010 due to cancer

     Dr. De Domenico was born in England, and qualified there as a physiotherapist in 1970.  Following a period of general experience in a variety of clinical settings, he undertook the Teacher of Physiotherapy program at the Coventry School of Physiotherapy and the North London Polytechnic, completing this program in 1975.  He was then appointed to the staff of the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, School of Physiotherapy, in Birmingham U.K. While in the U.K., Dr. De Domenico gained a Master of Science degree from the University of Aston, in Birmingham, followed by an appointment to the staff of the Wolverhampton School of Physiotherapy, in Wolverhampton.

 

       Dr. De Domenico emigrated to Australia in 1978, to take up an appointment in the School of Physiotherapy,  Faculty of Health Sciences, Sydney University, in Sydney, New South Wales. In 1984, he was appointed senior lecturer in the School of Physiotherapy at Curtin University, in Perth, Western Australia.  Whilst in Australia, Dr. De Domenico was responsible for undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and research in the broad areas of Electrophysical Agents and Soft Tissue Manipulation (Massage).  He was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in 1988, for his thesis entitled "Kinaesthetic Acuity and Motor Control in Humans".  This work was undertaken in the School of Physiology and Pharmacology at the University of New South Wales.

 

       Dr. De Domenico emigrated to Canada in 1989, to take up an appointment as Associate Professor in the School of Physiotherapy, at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  In this position, he was again responsible for teaching all aspects of Electrophysical Agents and Soft Tissue Massage.  He moved to Saskatchewan in 1992, as Professor and Director of the School of Physical Therapy, and Assistant Dean in the College of Medicine; at the University of Saskatchewan, in Saskatoon.

  In March of 1994, he moved to the USA as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Physical Therapy, at the University of South Alabama, in Mobile, Alabama.  His most current appointment took him to Texas in December 2000, as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Physical Therapy, at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

  In August of 2008, he stepped down as Chair of the Department, in order to concentrate on teaching and research in Electrophysical Agents and Soft Tissue Massage as well as engage in his personal fight against prostate cancer. 

    Dr. De Domenico is internationally known for his continuing education courses for clinicians on the broad area of Electrophysical Agents, especially for his knowledge and teaching of the principles and practice of Interferential Therapy.

     Dr. De Domenico has published his work extensively; with more than thirty-five publications, including four books and two monographs.  He has presented over 30 papers / posters at Scientific Conferences and has presented more than 120 continuing education lectures / courses in Australia, New Zealand, South East Asia, Europe and North America. He has been an active member of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) in the U.K., the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA), and the Canadian Physiotherapy Association (CPA); having served on many local and national committees. He has been a long time Board member of the Texas Society of Allied Health Professions (TSAHP) and served as the 2004 - 2005 President. He is also the editor of the TSAHP on-line newsletter, known as the Chronicle and the recipient of the 2008 Distinguished Service Award of the Society.  Dr. De Domenico is also the author of both the 4th and 5th editions of the well-known text on soft tissue manipulation called Beard’s Massage.

   In 2008 he joined with Bob Johnson of MedFaxx to author scientific research and articles on the use of the Infrex Plus and interferential therapy. He is serving as professional advisor on product development for MedFaxx and research director for human interactions due to electrical stimulus.

 

 

 

 

 

Books and Monographs

 

De Domenico, G. (2008) Principles and Practice of Soft Tissue Manipulation -Beard's Massage ( 5th  Ed.) Philadelphia: Elsevier  Saunders.

 

De Domenico, G. & Wood, E. (1997) Beard's Therapeutic Massage (4th Ed.)

Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders.

 

De Domenico, G. (1988) Interferential Stimulation: A Monograph. Chattanooga TN: Chattanooga Group, Inc.

 

Strauss, G.R., & De Domenico, G. (1988) Ed. Developments in EMS and FES Research and Clinical Practice. Proceedings of the Post Congress Symposium of the Tenth W.C.P.T. Congress, on Exercise and Rehabilitation, May 29-30, 1987. Perth: C.A.R.E.S.R. Publications.

 

Alon, G., & De Domenico, G. (1987) High Voltage Stimulation: An Integrated Approach to Clinical Electrotherapy. Chattanooga: Chattanooga Corporation.

 

De Domenico, G. (1987) New Dimensions in Interferential Therapy: A Theoretical and Clinical Guide. Sydney: Reid Medical Books.

 

De Domenico, G. (1981) Basic Guidelines for Interferential Therapy. Sydney: Theramed Books.

 

Papers published

 

De Domenico,  G.   (2003)  Soft Tissue Massage:  An Ancient Art in a Modern World

Part  2:  The Scientific Basis for Therapeutic Massage  San Antonio Medicine: Journal of the San Antonio Medical Society. 56, (6),  pp 25-28.

 

De Domenico,  G.   (2003)

Soft Tissue Massage:  An Ancient Art in a Modern World  Part 1:  Historical Perspectives.  San Antonio Medicine: Journal of the San Antonio Medical Society. 56, (5),  pp 18-20.

 

De Domenico,  G.   (2003)  Strengthening of the Abdominal Muscles with Electrical Stimulation  - Fact or Fantasy ?  San Antonio Medicine: Journal of the San Antonio Medical Society.  56, (5),  pp 26-29.

 

De Domenico, G. (1990) Fundamentals of Laser Bio-modulation. Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Biennial Conference. "Horizons 1990" University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, May 18-20, 1990.

 

De Domenico, G. (1990) Clinical Electrical Stimulation. Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Biennial Conference. "Horizons 1990" University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, May 18-20, 1990.

 

Szeto, G., Strauss, G.R., De Domenico, G. & LAI, H.S. (1989) The effect of training intensity on voluntary isometric strength improvement. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy. 35, 4, 210-217.

 

LAI, H., S., De Domenico, G. & Strauss, G. (1988) The effect of different EMS training intensities on strength improvement. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 34, 3, 151-164.

 

De Domenico, G. & Strauss, G.R. (1988) Effects of stimulation parameters on force production. In: STRAUSS, G.R., & De Domenico, G. Ed. Developments in EMS and FES Research and Clinical Practice. Proceedings of the Post Congress Symposium of the Tenth W.C.P.T. Congress, on Exercise and Rehabilitation, May 29-30, 1987. Perth: C.A.R.E.S.R. Publications, pp. 16-26.

 

Strauss, G.R., LAI, H.S. & De Domenico, G. (1988) Strength training at different intensities of maximal voluntary strength. In: STRAUSS, G.R., & De Domenico, G., Ed. Developments in EMS and FES Research and Clinical Practice. Proceeding of the Post Congress, on Exercise and Rehabilitation, 29-30th May 1987. Perth: C.A.R.E.S.R. Publications.

 

Whittington, D., Strauss, G. & De Domenico, G. (1988) the effect of frequency and intensity of EMS on fatigue in the Quadriceps Femoris muscle group. In: STRAUSS, G.R., & De Domenico, G., Ed. Developments in EMS and FES Research and Clinical Practice. Proceedings of the Post Congress Symposium of the Tenth W.C.P.T. Congress, on Exercise and Rehabilitation, May 29-30, 1987. Perth: C.A.R.E.S.R. Publications, pp. 62-69.

 

Singer, K., De Domenico, G. & Strauss, G. (1987) Electro-motor stimulation research methodology and reporting: A need for standardization. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 33, 1, 43-48.

 

De Domenico, G. & McCloskey, D.I. (1987) Accuracy of voluntary movements at the thumb and elbow joints. Experimental Brain Research. 65, 471-478.

 

De Domenico, G. (1986) Safe use of electro-therapeutic equipment. National Physiotherapy Bulletin of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. June, Vol. 1, 2, 1-2.

 

De Domenico, G. & Strauss, G.R. (1986) Maximum torque production in the Quadriceps Femoris Muscle group using a variety of electrical Stimulators. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 32, 1, 51-56.

 

Strauss, G.R. & De Domenico, G. (1986) Torque production in human upper and lower limb muscles with voluntary and electrically induced contractions. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 32, 1, 38-49.

 

Lloyd, T., De Domenico, G., Strauss, G.R. & Singer, K.P. (1986) A review of the use of electro-motor stimulation in human muscles. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 32, 1, 18-30.

 

De Domenico, G. & Strauss, G.R. (1985) Motor stimulation with interferential currents. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 31, 6, 225-230.

 

De Domenico, G. (1983) Duty of care in the use of electro-medical equipment. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 29, 5, V-VI.

 

De Domenico, G. (1983) Uses and abuses of Electrophysical agents. Proceedings of a symposium on repetitive strain injuries. Arthritis and Rheumatism Council, Sydney, Australia.

 

De Domenico, G. (1982) Pain relief with Interferential Therapy. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 28, 3, 14-18.

 

De Domenico, G. (1983) Interferential burns. Australian Physiotherapy Assoc. (NSW) Bulletin Dec/Jan, 26-28.

 

Alon, G., & De Domenico, G. (1983) The problem of electrode placement. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 29, 4, pp. 148.

 

De Domenico, G. (1982) Plastic bandages. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 28, 4, pp. 30.

 

De Domenico, G. & Watson, J. (1981) Pain relief in the 1980's - The Physiotherapist. What can he offer? Australian Hospital, 49, Jan/Feb.

 

De Domenico, G. (1979) Tonic Vibratory Reflex (T.V.R.) What is it? Can we use it? Physiotherapy, J. Chart. Soc. Physiotherapy. 65, 2, 44-48.

 

Abstracts

 

DE DOMENICO, G.  (2007)  Presentation Technology in the Classroom and Clinic:  Do I really need a Laptop ?  Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT). Vancouver Canada.   June,  2 – 6,  2007

 

De Domenico, G., Allen, L., Enlow, K., Love, K. & Merritt, M. (1995) A Comparison of the thermal characteristics of different types of moist heat pack. (Abstract) Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy. Washington, USA, June 25-29, 1995.

 

De Domenico G. (1991) Laser Bio-Modulation in Physiotherapy. Proceedings of the 11th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy. London, England, 28th July to 2nd August, 1991.

 

De Domenico, G., Cotton, S., Devereaux, D., King, H. & McIntosh, A. (1991) Skin Temperature Changes with different methods of Cryotherapy. Proceedings of the 11th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy. London, England, 28th July to 2nd August, 1991.

 

De Domenico, G., & Strauss, G.R. (1987) Muscle force production induced by electrical stimulation of motor nerves. Proceedings of the 10th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy. Book 1, pp. 356-360.

 

De Domenico, G., Stafford, R. & Kanachowski, R. (1987) Effective acoustic coupling with Ultrasound. Proceedings of the 10th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy. Book 1, pp. 328-332.

 

De Domenico, G., & McCloskey, D.I. (1986) Accuracy of control of unloaded movements and of production of isometric tension by proximal (elbow) and distal (thumb-tip) muscles. Neuroscience Letters, Supp. 23, S.40.

 

McCloskey, D.I., De Domenico, G. & Hall, L. (1982) Muscle lengths, proprioception and the accuracy of voluntary movements. Neuroscience Letters, Supplement 8, pp. 15.

 

De Domenico, G., & McCloskey, D. (1981) Accuracy of voluntary movements of the elbow joint. Proceedings of the Australian Physiological and Pharmacological Society, 12, pp. 2.

 


      
 


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