Short Circuit Ion Channels Cause Pain

  New research shows that the pain signal may be simply an "electrical leak" from an ion channel.  As previously written there is a connection between the opening and closing of ion channels and electrical polarity charges.  The new finding by a team of scientists at KU Leuven indicates the actual pain message is electrical and is short circuited due to chemical changes in the ion channels.  The ongoing research is showing the chemical and physical relationship of pain and electrical polarities.

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Healing Bedsores With Ultraviolet - C Range Print E-mail

    

  bedsore              
               
Healing Bedsores With Ultraviolet - C Range

 

   Bedsores are also known as pressure sores, decubitus ulcers, pressure ulcers and pressure wounds.  A lack of blood flow to the cells and tissues of an area cause bedsores.  The short-term duration of the deprivation of nutrients and oxygen very quickly kills the cells. Usually a bedsore is seen in patients confined to a wheelchair or bed.  Bedsores can develop quickly, progress rapidly and are often difficult to heal.

   One of the major areas of concern for a patient with a bedsore is that the patient’s immune system has been compromised and the bedsore is an open wound allowing germs and other pathogens access to the patient’s body, especially the circulatory system, which then gives access to all parts of the body and all organs.

    Bedsores can usually be cured, but about 60,000 deaths a year are attributed to complications caused by bedsores.   The Federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research reported that bedsores afflict 10% of all hospital patients, 25% of nursing home residents and 60% of quadriplegics.  A very conservative estimate of the cost to treat one bedsore was $3,900. 

 

 

Past Treatment

    Treatment of bedsores involves removing pressure from the affected tissue, keeping the area clean, promoting tissue regeneration, and removing necrotic (dead) tissue, which can form a breeding ground for infection.  Over time there have been multiple drug and topical formulations created to deal with certain aspects of the healing process as well as electrotherapy.  O3 has also been used and many new therapeutic beds exist to help facilitate less damage and promote healing.

 New Treatment With Ultraviolet-C range

   Chronic bedsores often are the result of infection setting in and the healing of the bedsore is then compromised as the wound stops healing as much of the body’s energy is used to fight off the infections.  In many situations the infection can become systemic, spreading throughout the body, as it is no longer localized in the bedsore only.  Systemic infections such as MRSA/VRE can be fatal as well as require long-term hospitalization and become extremely expensive to treat.

   Ultraviolet C has been shown to be the most effective treatment for all pathogens known to mankind.  No pathogen has ever shown an ability to resist or mutate when exposed to ultraviolet c range. Ultraviolet C has never led to the creation of what is called super germs, germs able to resist all known antibiotic drugs.  Ultraviolet C is not the same as what people are exposed to in sunlight and is not a carcinogenic form of ultraviolet as Ultraviolet A and B range have been shown to be.  Ultraviolet C range is completely safe for patients and is approved by the United States F.D.A. for wound healing and eradication of pathogens on the skin.

How To Treat

     The ultraviolet –c range device is held approximately 1 inch from the bedsore for approximately 60 seconds to kill all known pathogens in the bedsore.  This is if one is using the standard 4 watt ultraviolet bulb.   If the patient has a systemic infection the process is repeated anywhere from 1x per day to 3x per day until there is no detectable amount of bacteria or other pathogens in or on the patients body.  The bedsore will begin to heal immediately after the first treatment.

     If the wound bed is being cultured for the bacterial overload there will be an increase of the bacterial load after the first few treatments in a systemically infected patient in the wound bed as the ultraviolet treatment is creating an area for the bacteria to colonize in the exposed area.  The continuation of the treatment systematically reduces the patient’s bacterial load and the infection is destroyed in the bedsore and throughout the patient’s body. 

     Ethne Nussbaum did a pioneering study in the early 1990's combining ultraviolet with therapeutic ultrasound to accelerate the healing of bed sores, pressure sores.


 

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